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'If the factory closes what could I afford to eat?'

Sao Run is worried that if the clothing factory where she works closes down she won't be able to feed herself and her son.

A 34-year-old widow, she has spent almost 13 years making coats and jackets at a facility on the outskirts of Cambodia's capital, Phnom Penh.

With overtime she can earn up to $250 (£200) a month, but the future of the workshop and others like it in the country is now uncertain due to a continuing political dispute between the European Union (EU) and Cambodia.

Cambodia's garments manufacturing sector has boomed in recent years, in no small part due to the EU granting the country's exports tariff-free access to Europe, starting back in 2012.

This has led to about in the country, lured by both the country's low wages, and the fact they don't have to pay any duties when exporting to the EU.

However, at the start of October the EU warned that Cambodia's tariff-free access to the European single market could come to an end

EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom said that the EU was launching a six-month review of the situation in Cambodia, and that unless Phnom Penh showed "clear and demonstrable improvements, this would lead to suspension of trade preferences" within 12 months.

Her comments were a response to what both the EU and US see as increasingly autocratic behaviour by the Cambodian government of Prime Minister Hun Sen, who has been in power since 1985.

In July his helped by the fact that the main opposition party - the Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) - was officially shut down by the country's Supreme Court in November 2017.

The court ruling was based on a complaint by Hun Sen's government that

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